<![CDATA[CaixaBank - Communication]]> https://www.caixabank.com/aplnr/comunicacion/buscador/servicio.noticiasRSS_en.html WordPress <![CDATA[Turismo, motor de cambio para la economía española]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-22T07:16:57.0Z 2017-06-22T07:16:57.0Z <![CDATA[Turismo, motor de cambio para la economía española]]> 0 <![CDATA[Laia Palau: “The key is the family formed by all the players and the coaching staff”]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-16T00:00:00.0Z 2017-06-16T00:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[Laia Palau: “The key is the family formed by all the players and the coaching staff”]]> Today the Spanish basketball team is setting out on its bid for success at another major competition. EuroBasket 2017 is starting after a great run from our women players: first in European Championship in 2013, silver at the 2014 World Cup, third at the last European Championship and then the Olympic silver. According to the captain, Laia Palau, in this interview she held with us just hours before debuting against Hungary, they will not let their previous good results stand in the way of their mental preparation. She has said she will retire soon but is not ruling out taking part at the forthcoming World Cup, which will be held in Spain.

Laia, here you are again at a major championship, having spoilt us with success over the years. Do you feel a lot of pressure given the good results at the last major competitions?

I wouldn’t call it pressure. We are the first to establish a high level of commitment and responsibility in everything, not because of what we have achieved, which is not going to help us at all now, but rather because of a commitment to ourselves and to the team. We are always demanding improvement but not to feel more anxiety or pressure.

The first match is always important and special. You need to start the tournament on the right foot …

Definitely. Besides, it’s the only match that matters to us right now. Thinking on a day-to-day basis has worked well for us. Now, we are facing Hungary and it is important to start EuroBasket with the right feeling. We have prepared properly and want to start well.

It might be a cliché but it is true that this team gets on like a large family. That is not just a coincidence in Spain’s national teams. Do you think that this capacity to function as a group is one of the pillars of your success and that of other Spanish teams?

Of course. Bear in mind that we are gathered together for over forty days each summer. The dynamics matter a lot and lots of things are clearly required to achieve great things: quality, luck, work, etc. but the family we form with all the players and the coaching staff is certainly crucial.

We know you are coaching too. Does reaching this point in major tournaments start with strong and well-organised grassroots sport?

Every “age” in a sport is important. If there are no fans, then nobody plays and it’s very improbable that good players will emerge. If there are benchmarks, good examples, it’s more likely that children will get enthusiastic about playing a sport. There then has to be a good structure to help them. If none of us had come across an important coach who was good and who taught us … then maybe we would not have got to the place we have. It’s like that at every level. Clubs, regional federations and then the FEB … are essential.

Which rivals have caught your eye? Which teams are currently the strongest?

Gosh. First of all we’re concentrating on Hungary. We are a team that concentrates fully on the day in hand and perhaps, at a stretch, on the next. We don’t look beyond that. Perhaps there are people who don’t understand or share that … but it’s always worked very well for us. What is for certain is that it’s definitely going to be the hardest EuroBasket of recent times and a championship even more complicated than a World Cup or Olympics. The average standard is higher and there are six or seven teams that will be fighting to win.

You announced your retirement after this European championship. Is it true we won’t see you at the World Cup in Spain next year?

Each step at a time. I’m really enthusiastic about this EuroBasket in a country where I have been playing for the last four years and then I’ll go to Australia, which I also really want to do.

Thanks Laia. And good luck in the first match and in the tournament.

]]>
Today the Spanish basketball team is setting out on its bid for success at another major competition. EuroBasket 2017 is starting after a great run from our women players: first in European Championship in 2013, silver at the 2014 World Cup, third at the last European Championship and then the Olympic silver. According to the captain, Laia Palau, in this interview she held with us just hours before debuting against Hungary, they will not let their previous good results stand in the way of their mental preparation. She has said she will retire soon but is not ruling out taking part at the forthcoming World Cup, which will be held in Spain.

Laia, here you are again at a major championship, having spoilt us with success over the years. Do you feel a lot of pressure given the good results at the last major competitions?

I wouldn’t call it pressure. We are the first to establish a high level of commitment and responsibility in everything, not because of what we have achieved, which is not going to help us at all now, but rather because of a commitment to ourselves and to the team. We are always demanding improvement but not to feel more anxiety or pressure.

The first match is always important and special. You need to start the tournament on the right foot …

Definitely. Besides, it’s the only match that matters to us right now. Thinking on a day-to-day basis has worked well for us. Now, we are facing Hungary and it is important to start EuroBasket with the right feeling. We have prepared properly and want to start well.

It might be a cliché but it is true that this team gets on like a large family. That is not just a coincidence in Spain’s national teams. Do you think that this capacity to function as a group is one of the pillars of your success and that of other Spanish teams?

Of course. Bear in mind that we are gathered together for over forty days each summer. The dynamics matter a lot and lots of things are clearly required to achieve great things: quality, luck, work, etc. but the family we form with all the players and the coaching staff is certainly crucial.

We know you are coaching too. Does reaching this point in major tournaments start with strong and well-organised grassroots sport?

Every “age” in a sport is important. If there are no fans, then nobody plays and it’s very improbable that good players will emerge. If there are benchmarks, good examples, it’s more likely that children will get enthusiastic about playing a sport. There then has to be a good structure to help them. If none of us had come across an important coach who was good and who taught us … then maybe we would not have got to the place we have. It’s like that at every level. Clubs, regional federations and then the FEB … are essential.

Which rivals have caught your eye? Which teams are currently the strongest?

Gosh. First of all we’re concentrating on Hungary. We are a team that concentrates fully on the day in hand and perhaps, at a stretch, on the next. We don’t look beyond that. Perhaps there are people who don’t understand or share that … but it’s always worked very well for us. What is for certain is that it’s definitely going to be the hardest EuroBasket of recent times and a championship even more complicated than a World Cup or Olympics. The average standard is higher and there are six or seven teams that will be fighting to win.

You announced your retirement after this European championship. Is it true we won’t see you at the World Cup in Spain next year?

Each step at a time. I’m really enthusiastic about this EuroBasket in a country where I have been playing for the last four years and then I’ll go to Australia, which I also really want to do.

Thanks Laia. And good luck in the first match and in the tournament.

]]>
0
<![CDATA[CaixaBank opens an operating branch in Agadir, expanding its services to businesses in Morocco]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-15T02:00:00.0Z 2017-06-15T02:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[CaixaBank opens an operating branch in Agadir, expanding its services to businesses in Morocco]]> CaixaBank has opened a new operating branch in the city of Agadir in Morocco. This is CaixaBank’s third branch in the country, where it already has a position in Casablanca and Tangier. The bank, presided over by Chairman Jordi Gual and CEO Gonzalo Gortázar, has thus bolstered the services provided to businesses established in the region, as well as those looking to gain a foothold in the Moroccan market.

Like the rest of the CaixaBank international network, the branch will provide foreign trade, business banking and corporate banking services. Furthermore, the new branch will be staffed by specialists in financial services for the tourism, fishing and agricultural industries, which are central to the Agadir economy.

In fact, the branch will benefit from the support, products and know-how of AgroBank, CaixaBank’s specialist business line for the agricultural and food industry. This is the first time that CaixaBank has made its AgroBank services available internationally, offering an entirely unique range of specific products for the sector via dedicated branches.

Agadir is located in the Souss-Massa-Drâa region, some 600 kilometres south of Rabat. It is an internationally renowned tourism destination, where some of the largest investors in the hotel industry are Spanish business groups. Agadir also has a major fishing port, a significant food industry, and large areas of land put to agricultural use by both Moroccan and internationally-owned companies.

Support for business projects between Spain and Morocco

The opening of the Agadir branch sees CaixaBank expand the availability of its products and services to support business and investment between Spain and Morocco. The bank has been operating in the country since 2009, when it opened its first branch in Casablanca. In 2014 it extended its footprint, with the opening of a branch in Tangier. CaixaBank’s branches are staffed by a multicultural team of professionals with extensive expertise and insight into the Moroccan market.

CaixaBank has secured a significant market share among Spanish businesses operating in Morocco, and is the leading issuer of deposits originating in Spain.

Morocco represents a key country in CaixaBank’s international network, being the only country where the bank has more than one operating office, and operating under a banking licence that allows it to provide a full range of financial services. As well as in Morocco, CaixaBank also has operating branches in the United Kingdom (London) and Poland (Warsaw).

In March 2017 CaixaBank launched “Le Cercle” in Casablanca, a regular debate forum that brings together the Spanish and Moroccan business community at a specially designed location.

About the CaixaBank international network

CaixaBank’s international position is articulated via operating branches, representative branches, and cooperation agreements with leading correspondent banks.

CaixaBank currently has international branches in Morocco (Casablanca, Tangier and Agadir), United Kingdom (London) and Poland (Warsaw). The bank also has representative branches in China (Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong), France (Paris), Italy (Milan), Germany (Frankfurt), Dubai, India (New Delhi), Turkey (Istanbul), Singapore, Egypt (Cairo), Chile (Santiago de Chile), Colombia (Bogota), USA (New York), South Africa (Johannesburg) and Brazil (Sao Paulo).

]]>
CaixaBank has opened a new operating branch in the city of Agadir in Morocco. This is CaixaBank’s third branch in the country, where it already has a position in Casablanca and Tangier. The bank, presided over by Chairman Jordi Gual and CEO Gonzalo Gortázar, has thus bolstered the services provided to businesses established in the region, as well as those looking to gain a foothold in the Moroccan market.

Like the rest of the CaixaBank international network, the branch will provide foreign trade, business banking and corporate banking services. Furthermore, the new branch will be staffed by specialists in financial services for the tourism, fishing and agricultural industries, which are central to the Agadir economy.

In fact, the branch will benefit from the support, products and know-how of AgroBank, CaixaBank’s specialist business line for the agricultural and food industry. This is the first time that CaixaBank has made its AgroBank services available internationally, offering an entirely unique range of specific products for the sector via dedicated branches.

Agadir is located in the Souss-Massa-Drâa region, some 600 kilometres south of Rabat. It is an internationally renowned tourism destination, where some of the largest investors in the hotel industry are Spanish business groups. Agadir also has a major fishing port, a significant food industry, and large areas of land put to agricultural use by both Moroccan and internationally-owned companies.

Support for business projects between Spain and Morocco

The opening of the Agadir branch sees CaixaBank expand the availability of its products and services to support business and investment between Spain and Morocco. The bank has been operating in the country since 2009, when it opened its first branch in Casablanca. In 2014 it extended its footprint, with the opening of a branch in Tangier. CaixaBank’s branches are staffed by a multicultural team of professionals with extensive expertise and insight into the Moroccan market.

CaixaBank has secured a significant market share among Spanish businesses operating in Morocco, and is the leading issuer of deposits originating in Spain.

Morocco represents a key country in CaixaBank’s international network, being the only country where the bank has more than one operating office, and operating under a banking licence that allows it to provide a full range of financial services. As well as in Morocco, CaixaBank also has operating branches in the United Kingdom (London) and Poland (Warsaw).

In March 2017 CaixaBank launched “Le Cercle” in Casablanca, a regular debate forum that brings together the Spanish and Moroccan business community at a specially designed location.

About the CaixaBank international network

CaixaBank’s international position is articulated via operating branches, representative branches, and cooperation agreements with leading correspondent banks.

CaixaBank currently has international branches in Morocco (Casablanca, Tangier and Agadir), United Kingdom (London) and Poland (Warsaw). The bank also has representative branches in China (Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong), France (Paris), Italy (Milan), Germany (Frankfurt), Dubai, India (New Delhi), Turkey (Istanbul), Singapore, Egypt (Cairo), Chile (Santiago de Chile), Colombia (Bogota), USA (New York), South Africa (Johannesburg) and Brazil (Sao Paulo).

]]>
0
<![CDATA[Tourism accounts for 16% of Spain’s Gross Domestic Product, according to CaixaBank Research]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-07T11:30:00.0Z 2017-06-07T11:30:00.0Z <![CDATA[Tourism accounts for 16% of Spain’s Gross Domestic Product, according to CaixaBank Research]]> Tourism in Spain is well established as a key sector for the economy, and the latest figures reveal a buoyant industry: tourism accounts for 16% of Spanish GDP, with more than 75 million tourists visiting the country in 2016.

So indicates the CaixaBank Research monthly report entitled “Tourism: travelling into the future”, which was unveiled today in Madrid by Enric Fernández, the bank’s Chief Economist.

In the first four months of 2017 Spain welcomed 20 million international tourists, a record figure and 10.3% higher than in the same period 2016. At this pace, more than 84 million tourists will visit the country in 2017, edging Spain closer to overtaking France as the world’s leading tourist destination. Since 2007 the number of international tourists has jumped by more than 40%. Meanwhile, domestic tourism is also beginning to show signs of a recovery.

Tourism is a vital sector in Spain’s economy, based both on size and buoyancy, as well as its ability to impact other economic activities. Just how dynamic the tourism sector has been is made evident by the pace of growth in the last few decades, outstripping the expansion of the global economy as a whole. Furthermore, long-term prospects are equally upbeat.

Tourism, both foreign and domestic, is an increasingly large direct contributor to GDP, rising from 5.9% in 2010 to 6.4% in 2015. Including the indirect or knock-on effects on other economic sectors, the direct and indirect contribution made by tourism to GDP stands at 119 billion euros, equivalent to 11.1% of GDP. Around half of this is accounted for by foreign tourists, the weighting of which has increased in recent years.

Likewise, businesses directly or indirectly involved in tourism are likely to spend in other economic sectors, generating an additional economic impact. Factoring in this contribution, which is even more widely distributed across economic sectors, the overall impact had by tourism stands at 16% of GDP, showing a gradual increase since 2010, and standing far higher than the European average (9.6%).

Tourism also has a major bearing on job creation. Tourism directly and indirectly employed 2.5 million individuals in 2015, meaning 13% of total employment (1.4 percentage points more than in 2010). If we also include employment generated by secondary effects, the contribution stands at 16.2% of total employment, far higher than the European average (9.1%).

Spain is again the most competitive country in the world

Like other European countries, Spain benefits from Europe’s leading position in tourism demand, as well as the perceived insecurity of rival destinations in the Middle East. This European primacy is reflected in the breakdown of international tourist spending based on country of origin, dominated particularly by British tourists. Said composition has helped to drive a tourism boom in Spain, as the countries that account for the largest number of tourists heading to Spain are posting above average growth in outgoing tourist numbers.

Spain remains the most world’s most competitive country in the tourism sector, according to the 2017 ranking of 136 countries run by the World Economic Forum, ahead of France, Germany, Japan, United Kingdom, USA, Australia and Italy. This position is based on the country’s key strengths, such as a unique combination of natural beauty and culture, as well as good transport infrastructure and tourism services.

The Spanish tourism sector is comprised of 400,000 companies

Tourism has helped to correct some of the imbalances that have afflicted the Spanish economy in recent years: 11% of the current account balance correction was thanks to an increased surplus from the tourism services balance.

The Spanish tourism sector is made up of some 400,000 companies operating in various segments, such as accommodation, the catering industry, transport, vehicle rentals, and travel agencies. It is a highly fragmented industry, with many small companies and relatively few large operators.

Business size is important, as it is closely tied with aspects that determine business productivity: large tourism companies are nearly 30% more productive than small sized firms, and both large and small operators in Spain are more productive than their European counterparts. Furthermore, given that Spain has a higher proportion of large companies, the productivity difference for Spain’s tourism sector as a whole compared to Europe’s is considerable, standing at nearly 20%.

The emergence of new technologies

Technological progress has had a significant bearing on tourism in recent years. Emerging technologies have opened the door to new companies operating in the digital arena, which have radically overhauled part of the industry value chain. The impact has been felt particularly in the early stages of the purchase cycle. Meanwhile, in the medium term, the development of the “Internet of Things”, mobile robotics and artificial intelligence all have the potential to further revolutionise the sector.

Digitisation has also ushered in greater visibility and accessibility for the sharing economy, which is having a particularly strong bearing on the tourism sector, by expanding the range of goods and services available on the market.

However, the sharing economy poses significant regulatory challenges, as it could potentially leave consumers unprotected or see episodes of unfair competition, as companies already established in the market are subject to stricter regulations than new players. A well-defined regulatory framework is especially important for the tourism sector, as many activities inherent to the industry can generate negative externalities.

Opportunities and challenges going forward

There are clear long-term growth opportunities for the industry to capitalise on. By its very nature this is a sector with robust future prospects, as the proportion of household spending on tourism usually grows in line with income. Emerging economies, therefore, are very likely to represent a growing source of tourists, just as we have begun to see with China. Meanwhile, population ageing in Europe and other advanced economies is introducing highly attractive demand, as these tend to be relatively high income individuals who travel outside of peak tourism periods.

However, there are also multiple challenges: the sector needs to adapt to shifting demand going forward; greater coordination is required with other economic activity sectors; and, in order to prioritise investment in infrastructure, legislation needs to ensure the ordered development of the new business models that have emerged, and will emerge in future, as a result of new technologies.

]]>
Tourism in Spain is well established as a key sector for the economy, and the latest figures reveal a buoyant industry: tourism accounts for 16% of Spanish GDP, with more than 75 million tourists visiting the country in 2016.

So indicates the CaixaBank Research monthly report entitled “Tourism: travelling into the future”, which was unveiled today in Madrid by Enric Fernández, the bank’s Chief Economist.

In the first four months of 2017 Spain welcomed 20 million international tourists, a record figure and 10.3% higher than in the same period 2016. At this pace, more than 84 million tourists will visit the country in 2017, edging Spain closer to overtaking France as the world’s leading tourist destination. Since 2007 the number of international tourists has jumped by more than 40%. Meanwhile, domestic tourism is also beginning to show signs of a recovery.

Tourism is a vital sector in Spain’s economy, based both on size and buoyancy, as well as its ability to impact other economic activities. Just how dynamic the tourism sector has been is made evident by the pace of growth in the last few decades, outstripping the expansion of the global economy as a whole. Furthermore, long-term prospects are equally upbeat.

Tourism, both foreign and domestic, is an increasingly large direct contributor to GDP, rising from 5.9% in 2010 to 6.4% in 2015. Including the indirect or knock-on effects on other economic sectors, the direct and indirect contribution made by tourism to GDP stands at 119 billion euros, equivalent to 11.1% of GDP. Around half of this is accounted for by foreign tourists, the weighting of which has increased in recent years.

Likewise, businesses directly or indirectly involved in tourism are likely to spend in other economic sectors, generating an additional economic impact. Factoring in this contribution, which is even more widely distributed across economic sectors, the overall impact had by tourism stands at 16% of GDP, showing a gradual increase since 2010, and standing far higher than the European average (9.6%).

Tourism also has a major bearing on job creation. Tourism directly and indirectly employed 2.5 million individuals in 2015, meaning 13% of total employment (1.4 percentage points more than in 2010). If we also include employment generated by secondary effects, the contribution stands at 16.2% of total employment, far higher than the European average (9.1%).

Spain is again the most competitive country in the world

Like other European countries, Spain benefits from Europe’s leading position in tourism demand, as well as the perceived insecurity of rival destinations in the Middle East. This European primacy is reflected in the breakdown of international tourist spending based on country of origin, dominated particularly by British tourists. Said composition has helped to drive a tourism boom in Spain, as the countries that account for the largest number of tourists heading to Spain are posting above average growth in outgoing tourist numbers.

Spain remains the most world’s most competitive country in the tourism sector, according to the 2017 ranking of 136 countries run by the World Economic Forum, ahead of France, Germany, Japan, United Kingdom, USA, Australia and Italy. This position is based on the country’s key strengths, such as a unique combination of natural beauty and culture, as well as good transport infrastructure and tourism services.

The Spanish tourism sector is comprised of 400,000 companies

Tourism has helped to correct some of the imbalances that have afflicted the Spanish economy in recent years: 11% of the current account balance correction was thanks to an increased surplus from the tourism services balance.

The Spanish tourism sector is made up of some 400,000 companies operating in various segments, such as accommodation, the catering industry, transport, vehicle rentals, and travel agencies. It is a highly fragmented industry, with many small companies and relatively few large operators.

Business size is important, as it is closely tied with aspects that determine business productivity: large tourism companies are nearly 30% more productive than small sized firms, and both large and small operators in Spain are more productive than their European counterparts. Furthermore, given that Spain has a higher proportion of large companies, the productivity difference for Spain’s tourism sector as a whole compared to Europe’s is considerable, standing at nearly 20%.

The emergence of new technologies

Technological progress has had a significant bearing on tourism in recent years. Emerging technologies have opened the door to new companies operating in the digital arena, which have radically overhauled part of the industry value chain. The impact has been felt particularly in the early stages of the purchase cycle. Meanwhile, in the medium term, the development of the “Internet of Things”, mobile robotics and artificial intelligence all have the potential to further revolutionise the sector.

Digitisation has also ushered in greater visibility and accessibility for the sharing economy, which is having a particularly strong bearing on the tourism sector, by expanding the range of goods and services available on the market.

However, the sharing economy poses significant regulatory challenges, as it could potentially leave consumers unprotected or see episodes of unfair competition, as companies already established in the market are subject to stricter regulations than new players. A well-defined regulatory framework is especially important for the tourism sector, as many activities inherent to the industry can generate negative externalities.

Opportunities and challenges going forward

There are clear long-term growth opportunities for the industry to capitalise on. By its very nature this is a sector with robust future prospects, as the proportion of household spending on tourism usually grows in line with income. Emerging economies, therefore, are very likely to represent a growing source of tourists, just as we have begun to see with China. Meanwhile, population ageing in Europe and other advanced economies is introducing highly attractive demand, as these tend to be relatively high income individuals who travel outside of peak tourism periods.

However, there are also multiple challenges: the sector needs to adapt to shifting demand going forward; greater coordination is required with other economic activity sectors; and, in order to prioritise investment in infrastructure, legislation needs to ensure the ordered development of the new business models that have emerged, and will emerge in future, as a result of new technologies.

]]>
0
<![CDATA[CaixaBank’s environmental commitment]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-05T00:00:00.0Z 2017-06-05T00:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[CaixaBank’s environmental commitment]]> The Spanish philosopher and poet George Santayana once said, “The Earth has music for those who listen”. He was not wrong. Each and every day nature speaks to us, playing a multitude of symphonies and harmonies.

This year the voice for the environment within the United Nations, The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), has called on the global community to get out into the fresh air, to roam deep into natural spaces and to listen to nature, contemplating and appreciating its beauty and importance. All under the “Connecting people with nature”, theme chosen by the UN to celebrate what we are marking today, World Environment Day.

I’m with nature” is the slogan behind the campaign, which each year strives to boost awareness of environmental issues among the global community. The UN General Assembly established World Environment Day back in 1972, with thousands of events having been organised since to mark the occasion.

Nonetheless, we need to accept that protecting and caring for the environment must be a daily priority for each of us. Which is why CaixaBank is committed to reducing its environmental footprint and supporting sustainability and respect for the natural world. Indeed, it has been a staunch advocate of environmentally respectful initiatives and projects for more than 10 years. So, how do we at CaixaBank listen to the environment?

CaixaBank, connecting with nature

Said commitment saw CaixaBank join the financial institutions adhering to the Equator Principles, which aim to guarantee that all projects benefitting from financing and consultancy services are undertaken in a socially responsible manner. Over the last year the bank has kicked off a number of new initiatives, all working towards the same objective: to combat climate change.

CaixaBank is among the foremost businesses in terms of environmental management, as evidenced by its inclusion on The Climate A List” run by the CDP environmental organisation. In fact, one of CaixaBank’s strategic objectives is to support projects aimed at preventing and mitigating climate change.

One such programme is the reforestation project in Peru. This initiative forms part of a larger “Carbon Neutral Plan”, which aims to offset all emissions calculated in the bank’s carbon footprint as of 2018.

Last year the bank offset 20,239 tonnes of carbon dioxide via a project in the Madre de Dios region of Peru, which works to slow the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest by protecting 500,000 hectares of walnut plantations, and driving economic development to support agricultural workers in the region and improve their quality of life. CaixaBank aims to be the first bank in Spain, and one of the first in Europe, to undertake such action, establishing itself as a carbon-neutral operator by 2018.

Committed to renewable energies

Another CaixaBank initiative targets making exclusive use of renewably sourced energy. In June of last year CaixaBank announced that it was launching plan to use 100% renewable energy within three years.

The bank was thus included on the New York Climate Week RE100 list, which features the world’s foremost companies that have committed to using only renewable energy. “CaixaBank was already a frontrunner in using renewably-sourced electricity, and today’s decision sees it go one step further”, said Emily Farnworth, Campaign Director of RE100, after the bank announced the initiative. CaixaBank became the first Spanish organization to be included on the list.

These are just two CaixaBank projects aimed at combatting climate change. Further measures have also been implemented, including efforts to cut paper consumption and make exclusive use of recycled paper, as well as deploying smart PCs, selective waste collection, eco-efficient designs for new buildings, promoting the use of videocalls, and much more.

Sustainable Development Objectives

CaixaBank is also a supporter of the UN Sustainable Development Objectives (SDO) adopted by the United Nations in 2015 with the aim of eradicating poverty, protecting the planet and safeguarding prosperity. CaixaBank’s anti-climate change initiatives particularly work towards two of the global objectives: SDO 12, Responsible production and consumption and SDO 13, Climate action.

While there are millions of initiatives currently underway to help protect the natural environment, there is still much more work to be done… What about you? Have you stopped to listen to nature? Take the opportunity to connect with nature today!

]]>
The Spanish philosopher and poet George Santayana once said, “The Earth has music for those who listen”. He was not wrong. Each and every day nature speaks to us, playing a multitude of symphonies and harmonies.

This year the voice for the environment within the United Nations, The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), has called on the global community to get out into the fresh air, to roam deep into natural spaces and to listen to nature, contemplating and appreciating its beauty and importance. All under the “Connecting people with nature”, theme chosen by the UN to celebrate what we are marking today, World Environment Day.

I’m with nature” is the slogan behind the campaign, which each year strives to boost awareness of environmental issues among the global community. The UN General Assembly established World Environment Day back in 1972, with thousands of events having been organised since to mark the occasion.

Nonetheless, we need to accept that protecting and caring for the environment must be a daily priority for each of us. Which is why CaixaBank is committed to reducing its environmental footprint and supporting sustainability and respect for the natural world. Indeed, it has been a staunch advocate of environmentally respectful initiatives and projects for more than 10 years. So, how do we at CaixaBank listen to the environment?

CaixaBank, connecting with nature

Said commitment saw CaixaBank join the financial institutions adhering to the Equator Principles, which aim to guarantee that all projects benefitting from financing and consultancy services are undertaken in a socially responsible manner. Over the last year the bank has kicked off a number of new initiatives, all working towards the same objective: to combat climate change.

CaixaBank is among the foremost businesses in terms of environmental management, as evidenced by its inclusion on The Climate A List” run by the CDP environmental organisation. In fact, one of CaixaBank’s strategic objectives is to support projects aimed at preventing and mitigating climate change.

One such programme is the reforestation project in Peru. This initiative forms part of a larger “Carbon Neutral Plan”, which aims to offset all emissions calculated in the bank’s carbon footprint as of 2018.

Last year the bank offset 20,239 tonnes of carbon dioxide via a project in the Madre de Dios region of Peru, which works to slow the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest by protecting 500,000 hectares of walnut plantations, and driving economic development to support agricultural workers in the region and improve their quality of life. CaixaBank aims to be the first bank in Spain, and one of the first in Europe, to undertake such action, establishing itself as a carbon-neutral operator by 2018.

Committed to renewable energies

Another CaixaBank initiative targets making exclusive use of renewably sourced energy. In June of last year CaixaBank announced that it was launching plan to use 100% renewable energy within three years.

The bank was thus included on the New York Climate Week RE100 list, which features the world’s foremost companies that have committed to using only renewable energy. “CaixaBank was already a frontrunner in using renewably-sourced electricity, and today’s decision sees it go one step further”, said Emily Farnworth, Campaign Director of RE100, after the bank announced the initiative. CaixaBank became the first Spanish organization to be included on the list.

These are just two CaixaBank projects aimed at combatting climate change. Further measures have also been implemented, including efforts to cut paper consumption and make exclusive use of recycled paper, as well as deploying smart PCs, selective waste collection, eco-efficient designs for new buildings, promoting the use of videocalls, and much more.

Sustainable Development Objectives

CaixaBank is also a supporter of the UN Sustainable Development Objectives (SDO) adopted by the United Nations in 2015 with the aim of eradicating poverty, protecting the planet and safeguarding prosperity. CaixaBank’s anti-climate change initiatives particularly work towards two of the global objectives: SDO 12, Responsible production and consumption and SDO 13, Climate action.

While there are millions of initiatives currently underway to help protect the natural environment, there is still much more work to be done… What about you? Have you stopped to listen to nature? Take the opportunity to connect with nature today!

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<![CDATA[Politicians and business leaders attend The Circle, the new business debate forum created by CaixaBank]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-01T18:00:00.0Z 2017-06-01T18:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[Politicians and business leaders attend The Circle, the new business debate forum created by CaixaBank]]> CaixaBank organized the first ever The Circle event, a new debate forum to support business in Poland, today at the Spanish embassy in Warsaw. Leading figures from politics and economics attended the event, including Tadeusz Koscinski, Minister for Development; Witold Orlowski, Professor of Economics and former Economic Advisor to the Polish Presidency; and Pablo Conde Díez del Corral, Spain’s Economic and Trade Advisor in Warsaw.

CaixaBank executives also attended the event. Deputy Chairman Antoni Massanell. commented: "We are delighted that both speakers and guests have accepted our invitation. Today’s panel discussion during The Circle Forum highlighted that there is a range of economic topics to be discussed. CaixaBank would like to be with our clients wherever they need us.”

 

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CaixaBank organized the first ever The Circle event, a new debate forum to support business in Poland, today at the Spanish embassy in Warsaw. Leading figures from politics and economics attended the event, including Tadeusz Koscinski, Minister for Development; Witold Orlowski, Professor of Economics and former Economic Advisor to the Polish Presidency; and Pablo Conde Díez del Corral, Spain’s Economic and Trade Advisor in Warsaw.

CaixaBank executives also attended the event. Deputy Chairman Antoni Massanell. commented: "We are delighted that both speakers and guests have accepted our invitation. Today’s panel discussion during The Circle Forum highlighted that there is a range of economic topics to be discussed. CaixaBank would like to be with our clients wherever they need us.”

 

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<![CDATA[CaixaBank places its first ever issue of preferred bonds eventually convertible into shares, issuing 1 billion euros and attracting demand in excess of 3.3 billion euros]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-06-01T00:00:00.0Z 2017-06-01T00:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[CaixaBank places its first ever issue of preferred bonds eventually convertible into shares, issuing 1 billion euros and attracting demand in excess of 3.3 billion euros]]> CaixaBank, the leading financial group in the Iberian Peninsula, has completed its first issue of preferred bonds eventually convertible into shares, issuing €1 billion with a coupon rate of 6.75%. These are perpetual preferred securities, callable as of the seventh year.

The outstanding demand attracted by the issue allowed CaixaBank to set a final coupon rate 25 basis points below the initial offer of 7.00%. CaixaBank thus becomes the first Spanish issuer to make its initial issue callable after 7 years, rather than the standard 5 years for such issues, demonstrating investor confidence in CaixaBank’s credit quality and solvency.

This new issue further strengthens the bank’s already excellent solvency ratios, to 12.6% Tier 1 and to 16.1% Total Capital in phased-in terms, while also driving up CaixaBank’s high-quality liquid assets, which as per 31 March stood at 47,206 million euros, with a liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) standing at 158%, well above the 80% minimum requirement for 2017.

This is the fourth institutional debt issue of 2017 for CaixaBank, which becomes the only Spanish issuer to have raised financing in all formats in the year to date, having issued 10-year covered bonds, 7-year senior debt, and Tier 2 subordinated debt maturing in 10 years, allowing the bank to extend its maturity profile and capitalise on the scenario of historically low interest rates.

International demand

CaixaBank, presided over by Chairman Jordi Gual and CEO Gonzalo Gortázar, took advantage of good market conditions to complete the issue, with investors demonstrating their confidence in the group’s strengths, as well as the outstanding credit quality backing these kinds of issues.

The issue attracted an excellent response from the 200 institutional investors that showed interest in CaixaBank credit. There was strong participation from foreign investors.

On Monday Standard & Poor’s allocated the issue a BB- rating. Barclays and Société Générale were the structuring banks for the operation, and were supported in the placement by JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and CaixaBank CIB.

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CaixaBank, the leading financial group in the Iberian Peninsula, has completed its first issue of preferred bonds eventually convertible into shares, issuing €1 billion with a coupon rate of 6.75%. These are perpetual preferred securities, callable as of the seventh year.

The outstanding demand attracted by the issue allowed CaixaBank to set a final coupon rate 25 basis points below the initial offer of 7.00%. CaixaBank thus becomes the first Spanish issuer to make its initial issue callable after 7 years, rather than the standard 5 years for such issues, demonstrating investor confidence in CaixaBank’s credit quality and solvency.

This new issue further strengthens the bank’s already excellent solvency ratios, to 12.6% Tier 1 and to 16.1% Total Capital in phased-in terms, while also driving up CaixaBank’s high-quality liquid assets, which as per 31 March stood at 47,206 million euros, with a liquidity coverage ratio (LCR) standing at 158%, well above the 80% minimum requirement for 2017.

This is the fourth institutional debt issue of 2017 for CaixaBank, which becomes the only Spanish issuer to have raised financing in all formats in the year to date, having issued 10-year covered bonds, 7-year senior debt, and Tier 2 subordinated debt maturing in 10 years, allowing the bank to extend its maturity profile and capitalise on the scenario of historically low interest rates.

International demand

CaixaBank, presided over by Chairman Jordi Gual and CEO Gonzalo Gortázar, took advantage of good market conditions to complete the issue, with investors demonstrating their confidence in the group’s strengths, as well as the outstanding credit quality backing these kinds of issues.

The issue attracted an excellent response from the 200 institutional investors that showed interest in CaixaBank credit. There was strong participation from foreign investors.

On Monday Standard & Poor’s allocated the issue a BB- rating. Barclays and Société Générale were the structuring banks for the operation, and were supported in the placement by JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley and CaixaBank CIB.

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<![CDATA[Ferran Latorre: \"Close to the summit, you realise that this is an important moment in your life\"]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-05-31T00:00:00.0Z 2017-05-31T00:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[Ferran Latorre: \"Close to the summit, you realise that this is an important moment in your life\"]]> His voice sounds tired over the crackling phone line from Kathmandu, and he admits that's just how he feels. Ferran Latorre (Barcelona, 1970) has just conquered Everest and the challenge of a lifetime, scaling another three enormous mountains over the eight thousand metre mark. If he wasn't tired, he'd be super-human. But Latorre is as human as his words, telling us about the difficulties and joys he has experienced in this latest conquest and he hints at a secret about the future.

Ferran, after so many years, when you are about to reach the summit, not only of this mountain but completing such an enormous challenge, what were the last few metres like? What were you thinking about?

As you can imagine, it's very emotional. Close to the top, it's not like your life flashes before you, because it's impossible to remember everything, but you feel like it's a very important moment in your life and you enjoy it, because you've been working for this for many years and it's a great thing to experience.

You've had a special relationship with Everest. Is that why you left it for the end?

I went to Everest when I first began with the CaixaBank sponsorship but it didn't work out. So I decided to leave it until last. It seems like a good, epic way to finish this project. It was what I wanted most of all as a teenager, what I focussed on in my ambitions to be a mountaineer so I chose to leave it until the end.

What was the most difficult thing about this ascent?

There was a critical moment. At about one in the morning, the sherpa who was with me decided to quit, he didn't feel well enough to continue and one of the regulators had broken. That sensation of being left alone, although there were other people on the mountain, but without the person you were planning on going up with... what's more, it was at a point when the weather was really bad, maybe the worst on the whole ascent, very windy, it was snowing harder.... it can make you doubt yourself. We'd been away from base camp for five days and anything can happen in that time. Another complicated moment was when I caught the flu or something similar. It gets you down, seeing that you're losing all that acclimatisation. During such a long expedition, you go through many psychological phases and there are times of doubt, times when you don't know how it's going to go for you. They are difficult situations.

There was plenty of news coming off the mountain. There was talk of over-crowding on the mountain. Were there really so many people on Everest this year?

Honestly, no. I believe that there were less people this year than in other seasons. 2012 really stands out but this year was normal. There are many more expeditions at the same time on Mont Blanc for example. I think people over-exaggerate what they say about Everest. Yes, there are other mountaineers but you don't feel like you are surrounded by people. The day we reached the summit, no more than thirty people made it and that's not an excessive number.

During this last stage, you worked with a research project funded by ”la Caixa” Banking Foundation to find out more about COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Would you encourage other mountaineers to join this type of project?

Of course. An important part of this expedition is that it was used for scientific research. In addition to being useful for sport and to motivate other people, I am proud that prestigious and talented researchers noticed me and this project to be able to contribute to their studies. Something that makes me happy about this challenge is that I believe that I have managed to build strong ties and friendships with many people.

Ferran, to finish off, you defined this challenge as "the challenge of a lifetime" but you are pretty young still, so the question I have to ask is... What next?

((laughs)) Now, I'd like to talk about this experience with other people to motivate them in their lives, in their personal projects, as in my case. I've still got time for another sporting project... but I'm not going to reveal that yet.

]]>
His voice sounds tired over the crackling phone line from Kathmandu, and he admits that's just how he feels. Ferran Latorre (Barcelona, 1970) has just conquered Everest and the challenge of a lifetime, scaling another three enormous mountains over the eight thousand metre mark. If he wasn't tired, he'd be super-human. But Latorre is as human as his words, telling us about the difficulties and joys he has experienced in this latest conquest and he hints at a secret about the future.

Ferran, after so many years, when you are about to reach the summit, not only of this mountain but completing such an enormous challenge, what were the last few metres like? What were you thinking about?

As you can imagine, it's very emotional. Close to the top, it's not like your life flashes before you, because it's impossible to remember everything, but you feel like it's a very important moment in your life and you enjoy it, because you've been working for this for many years and it's a great thing to experience.

You've had a special relationship with Everest. Is that why you left it for the end?

I went to Everest when I first began with the CaixaBank sponsorship but it didn't work out. So I decided to leave it until last. It seems like a good, epic way to finish this project. It was what I wanted most of all as a teenager, what I focussed on in my ambitions to be a mountaineer so I chose to leave it until the end.

What was the most difficult thing about this ascent?

There was a critical moment. At about one in the morning, the sherpa who was with me decided to quit, he didn't feel well enough to continue and one of the regulators had broken. That sensation of being left alone, although there were other people on the mountain, but without the person you were planning on going up with... what's more, it was at a point when the weather was really bad, maybe the worst on the whole ascent, very windy, it was snowing harder.... it can make you doubt yourself. We'd been away from base camp for five days and anything can happen in that time. Another complicated moment was when I caught the flu or something similar. It gets you down, seeing that you're losing all that acclimatisation. During such a long expedition, you go through many psychological phases and there are times of doubt, times when you don't know how it's going to go for you. They are difficult situations.

There was plenty of news coming off the mountain. There was talk of over-crowding on the mountain. Were there really so many people on Everest this year?

Honestly, no. I believe that there were less people this year than in other seasons. 2012 really stands out but this year was normal. There are many more expeditions at the same time on Mont Blanc for example. I think people over-exaggerate what they say about Everest. Yes, there are other mountaineers but you don't feel like you are surrounded by people. The day we reached the summit, no more than thirty people made it and that's not an excessive number.

During this last stage, you worked with a research project funded by ”la Caixa” Banking Foundation to find out more about COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease). Would you encourage other mountaineers to join this type of project?

Of course. An important part of this expedition is that it was used for scientific research. In addition to being useful for sport and to motivate other people, I am proud that prestigious and talented researchers noticed me and this project to be able to contribute to their studies. Something that makes me happy about this challenge is that I believe that I have managed to build strong ties and friendships with many people.

Ferran, to finish off, you defined this challenge as "the challenge of a lifetime" but you are pretty young still, so the question I have to ask is... What next?

((laughs)) Now, I'd like to talk about this experience with other people to motivate them in their lives, in their personal projects, as in my case. I've still got time for another sporting project... but I'm not going to reveal that yet.

]]>
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<![CDATA[The chairman of CaixaBank has a meeting with the Prime Minister of India]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-05-31T00:00:00.0Z 2017-05-31T00:00:00.0Z <![CDATA[The chairman of CaixaBank has a meeting with the Prime Minister of India]]> Jordi Gual, chairman of CaixaBank, today had a meeting with the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, who during his visit to Spain met a group of chairmen and executives of major Spanish institutions.

Jordi Gual told the Indian Prime Minister about CaixaBank's interests in this Asian country, where the bank has had a representation office in New Delhi since 2011 in order to support the activities of SMEs and major corporations. This office gives companies advice and support during their process of internationalisation in order to improve communication with local financial institutions and support both Indian and Spanish clients in the field of overseas trade and investment.

It should be stressed that in 2016 CaixaBank signed a Cooperation Agreement with the State Bank of India (SBI) to strengthen relations between the two organisations and make the SBI a strategic banking partner for CaixaBank in India. This agreement opened up different areas for cooperation with the aim of fostering international trade and supporting the country's economic development and financial inclusion. With alliances of this kind, CaixaBank helps to build up business opportunities between Spain and India, boosting job creation in both countries.

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Jordi Gual, chairman of CaixaBank, today had a meeting with the Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, who during his visit to Spain met a group of chairmen and executives of major Spanish institutions.

Jordi Gual told the Indian Prime Minister about CaixaBank's interests in this Asian country, where the bank has had a representation office in New Delhi since 2011 in order to support the activities of SMEs and major corporations. This office gives companies advice and support during their process of internationalisation in order to improve communication with local financial institutions and support both Indian and Spanish clients in the field of overseas trade and investment.

It should be stressed that in 2016 CaixaBank signed a Cooperation Agreement with the State Bank of India (SBI) to strengthen relations between the two organisations and make the SBI a strategic banking partner for CaixaBank in India. This agreement opened up different areas for cooperation with the aim of fostering international trade and supporting the country's economic development and financial inclusion. With alliances of this kind, CaixaBank helps to build up business opportunities between Spain and India, boosting job creation in both countries.

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<![CDATA[CaixaBank organizes The Circle, a new debate forum to support business in Poland]]> https://blog.caixabank.es/?p=23645 2017-05-30T11:30:00.0Z 2017-05-30T11:30:00.0Z <![CDATA[CaixaBank organizes The Circle, a new debate forum to support business in Poland]]> CaixaBank is the leading operator in the Spanish financial industry, and has been operating in Poland for ten years. On 1 June it will inaugurate a new forum for economic debate in Warsaw called The Circle. The initiative aims to promote analysis of economic prospects and to keep international executives in touch with the Polish business world, while also providing impetus for the country’s business community.

The Circle will be a regular event examining key topics on the economic agenda. CaixaBank plans to organise different The Circle events in 2017, each focusing on different key topics.

Leading figures are set to attend the inaugural The Circle event

The first ever The Circle event will be held on Thursday 1 June at the Spanish embassy in Warsaw. Leading figures in the country are due to attend, including Tadeusz Koscinski, Minister for Development; Witold Orlwoski, Professor of Economics and former Economic Advisor to the Polish Presidency; and Pablo Conde Díez del Corral, Spain’s Economic and Trade Advisor in Warsaw.

CaixaBank executives will also be attending the event, including Deputy Chairman Antoni Massanell and Enric Fernández, Corporate Director of CaixaBank Research.

Support for business projects between Spain and Poland

The Circle represents the first initiative to mark the tenth anniversary of CaixaBank's arrival in Poland. Over the course of the last decade the bank has established itself as a specialist in business banking, while it has also been a driving force behind growth projects across Poland.

CaixaBank provides financing and specialised services to businesses via an extensive range of corporate banking solutions, including guarantees, bilateral loans, syndicated loans and transactional banking. Significant service customization is one of CaixaBank’s hallmarks, and so too is its flexibility and absolute dedication to providing outstanding service quality.

Due to its Spanish roots, CaixaBank has among its clients numerous Spanish-owned companies that have operations in Poland, or companies that have plans to invest in the country. The bank is now well established in the local financial sector and has attracted a significant number of polish companies, with the same now accounting for 50% of its client portfolio.

These figures shore up Poland’s standing as a key country in CaixaBank's international network.

Poland’s position within the CaixaBank international network

Poland is one of three countries where CaixaBank has international operating branches, together with Morocco and the United Kingdom.

The bank also has representative offices in China (Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong), Paris, Milan, Frankfurt, Dubai, New Delhi, Istanbul, Singapore, Cairo, Santiago de Chile, Bogota, New York, Johannesburg and Sao Paulo. It likewise has cooperation agreements with leading correspondent banks around the world, helping its business clients to reach more than 170 countries.

 

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CaixaBank is the leading operator in the Spanish financial industry, and has been operating in Poland for ten years. On 1 June it will inaugurate a new forum for economic debate in Warsaw called The Circle. The initiative aims to promote analysis of economic prospects and to keep international executives in touch with the Polish business world, while also providing impetus for the country’s business community.

The Circle will be a regular event examining key topics on the economic agenda. CaixaBank plans to organise different The Circle events in 2017, each focusing on different key topics.

Leading figures are set to attend the inaugural The Circle event

The first ever The Circle event will be held on Thursday 1 June at the Spanish embassy in Warsaw. Leading figures in the country are due to attend, including Tadeusz Koscinski, Minister for Development; Witold Orlwoski, Professor of Economics and former Economic Advisor to the Polish Presidency; and Pablo Conde Díez del Corral, Spain’s Economic and Trade Advisor in Warsaw.

CaixaBank executives will also be attending the event, including Deputy Chairman Antoni Massanell and Enric Fernández, Corporate Director of CaixaBank Research.

Support for business projects between Spain and Poland

The Circle represents the first initiative to mark the tenth anniversary of CaixaBank's arrival in Poland. Over the course of the last decade the bank has established itself as a specialist in business banking, while it has also been a driving force behind growth projects across Poland.

CaixaBank provides financing and specialised services to businesses via an extensive range of corporate banking solutions, including guarantees, bilateral loans, syndicated loans and transactional banking. Significant service customization is one of CaixaBank’s hallmarks, and so too is its flexibility and absolute dedication to providing outstanding service quality.

Due to its Spanish roots, CaixaBank has among its clients numerous Spanish-owned companies that have operations in Poland, or companies that have plans to invest in the country. The bank is now well established in the local financial sector and has attracted a significant number of polish companies, with the same now accounting for 50% of its client portfolio.

These figures shore up Poland’s standing as a key country in CaixaBank's international network.

Poland’s position within the CaixaBank international network

Poland is one of three countries where CaixaBank has international operating branches, together with Morocco and the United Kingdom.

The bank also has representative offices in China (Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong), Paris, Milan, Frankfurt, Dubai, New Delhi, Istanbul, Singapore, Cairo, Santiago de Chile, Bogota, New York, Johannesburg and Sao Paulo. It likewise has cooperation agreements with leading correspondent banks around the world, helping its business clients to reach more than 170 countries.

 

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